Cisco Certified Design Associate (CCDA)
200-310 Cisco DESGN
DESGN 3.0: Branch Office and Datacenter Design
DESGN 3.0: Building a Modular Network Design
DESGN 3.0: Campus Network Design Fundamentals
DESGN 3.0: Designing a Highly Available Campus Network
DESGN 3.0: Designing a Network for Collaboration and Introducing IP Addressing
DESGN 3.0: Designing a Secure Network and Edge Connectivity
DESGN 3.0: Designing IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing Plans
DESGN 3.0: Designing Routed Networks with EIGRP and OSPF
DESGN 3.0: Designing Routed Networks with IS-IS and BGP
DESGN 3.0: Designing Wide Area Networks
DESGN 3.0: Managing IP Addresses and Introducing SDN
DESGN 3.0: Network Design Methodologies
DESGN 3.0: Supporting QoS and Wireless in a Network Design
TestPrep 200-310 Designing for Cisco Internetwork Solutions (DESGN)

Branch Office and Datacenter Design

Course Number:
cc_desn_a07_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Branch Office and Datacenter Design

  • start the course
  • describe branch putting pressure on the WAN
  • describe common branch connectivity options
  • describe branch redundancy options
  • compare single-carrier WANs vs. dual-carrier WANs
  • describe dual-carrier MPLS/VPN WAN
  • describe hybrid WAN: layer 3 provider VPN and IPSec VPN
  • implement hybrid WAN: layer 3 provider VPN and IPSec VPN
  • describe hybrid WAN: layer 2 provider VPN and IPSec VPN
  • compare centralized and local branch Internet access
  • describe remote-site LAN: flat layer 2
  • describe remote-site LAN: collapsed core
  • describe datacenter architecture
  • describe datacenter Ethernet infrastructure
  • describe datacenter storage integration
  • describe datacenter reference architecture
  • describe server virtualization and virtual switch
  • describe resilient datacenter core options
  • implement resilient datacenter core options
  • describe datacenter security
  • describe the need to connect datacenters
  • describe extending layer 2 between datacenters
  • describe supporting server scalability
  • describe application-level load balancing
  • describe network-level load balancing
  • implement the design of a datacenter

Overview/Description
Connecting a branch office to the main office is not a hard task. The hard task is making sure that branch user requirements are being met and the WAN is not being pressured. The size of the branch office is also critical. You do not want to spend more than you need to for the design. In addition, the Datacenter is the center of all resources, and having a well-designed datacenter that considers scalability and high availability is critical. This course identifies various options for connecting branch offices to a main office. It focuses on single options as well as redundant options. It also describes how the branch office LANs could be designed based on business needs. Lastly, datacenter design is introduced with a focus on designing resilient and scalable datacenters.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Building a Modular Network Design

Course Number:
cc_desn_a02_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Building a Modular Network Design

  • start the course
  • describe network convergence
  • describe why you would modularize
  • describe how to modularize
  • describe the methodology behind modular design
  • describe where you should hide information
  • describe the amount of information hiding that is recommended
  • describe modularity and fault domains
  • describe how scalability can be achieved through modular design
  • describe how resiliency is achieved through modular design
  • outline and describe typical enterprise network modules
  • describe typical enterprise network modules
  • describe hub-and-spoke design
  • describe three-layer hierarchy
  • describe the access layer
  • describe multilayer hierarchy
  • describe virtualization
  • describe the reasons for virtualization
  • describe the types of virtualization
  • describe the consequences of virtualization
  • implement modular network design

Overview/Description
As a network administrator, you will design a network that supports current needs and future needs. You will also ensure that it responds well to failures and limits the scope of those failures. Your goal will be to design a highly available, scalable network that is responsive to failures. This course identifies how to build a modular network and the benefits received from doing so. It introduces you to a hierarchical model built of layers that will provide many benefits. It also covers the benefits and drawbacks of virtualization.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Campus Network Design Fundamentals

Course Number:
cc_desn_a03_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Campus Network Design Fundamentals

  • start the course
  • compare end-to-end and local VLANs
  • describe traditional layer 2 access layer
  • describe updated layer 2 access layer
  • describe layer 3 access layer
  • describe routed or switched access layer
  • describe hybrid access layer
  • describe small and medium campus design options
  • describe VLAN and trunk considerations
  • describe VTP considerations
  • describe STP considerations
  • describe STP root bridge placement
  • describe alignment of STP with FHRP
  • describe consistent STP metrics
  • describe Cisco STP toolkit
  • describe STP stability mechanism recommendations
  • describe the problem with unidirectional links
  • compare loop guard with UDLD
  • describe the need for MST
  • describe MST recommended practices
  • describe convergence of access-distribution blocks
  • describe load balancing between access and distribution layer switches
  • describe designs that support extending VLANs across multiple access switches

Overview/Description
The first point of network contact for resources and end stations is the access layer. Will it be a Layer 2 or Layer 3 access layer? Do you need VLANs and Trunks? Will you have redundancy, and if so, is it causing loops that must be resolved? These questions will be answered in this course. This course analyzes the benefits and drawbacks of routed vs. switched access layers and the differences between End-to-End and Local VLAN deployments. It also considers the options you have when deploying Trunks and if VTP is needed or not. Lastly, it reviews the need for STP and the importance of proper STP design.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing a Highly Available Campus Network

Course Number:
cc_desn_a04_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing a Highly Available Campus Network

  • start the course
  • describe managing bandwidth and oversubscription
  • compare port aggregation considerations
  • describe EtherChannel establishment
  • describe port aggregation considerations
  • describe VSS considerations
  • describe stacking considerations
  • describe first hop redundancy
  • describe HSRP and VRRP subsecond failover
  • describe HSRP and VRRP pre-empt delay
  • describe HSRP/VRRP load sharing
  • describe HSRP/VRRP tracking
  • describe the case for GLBP
  • describe the case against GLBP
  • describe the need for building triangles
  • describe redundant links
  • describe routing convergence
  • describe the need to limit peering across the access layer
  • describe how to summarize at the distribution layer
  • describe network requirements of applications
  • describe client-server traffic considerations
  • compare intrabuilding and interbuilding connectivity
  • describe transmission media considerations
  • implement transmission media

Overview/Description
Providing high availability within a campus is essential for business success. Every second the network is down is costly. Your goal should be to provide adequate bandwidth, redundant devices, redundant connections, and redundant services, within a Campus and between Campuses. This course describes how you can implement high availability within the Campus using redundant links, port aggregation, VSS, stacking, and first hop redundancy protocols. It also describes what you need to consider when implementing Layer 3 within your design. To wrap up the course, focus is placed on what you need to keep in mind when you are interconnecting devices within a campus and between campuses to support resources.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing a Network for Collaboration and Introducing IP Addressing

Course Number:
cc_desn_a11_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing a Network for Collaboration and Introducing IP Addressing

  • start the course
  • describe the need for collaboration
  • describe the components of collaboration
  • describe the collaboration building blocks
  • describe the need for collaboration building blocks
  • describe the components within the collaboration building blocks
  • describe what the collaboration building blocks contain
  • describe how to support IP telephony
  • describe voice VLAN
  • describe the protocols of IP telephony
  • describe collaboration traffic
  • describe traffic patterns
  • assure a good user experience
  • describe IP addressing goals
  • implement and plan IP addressing
  • describe and plan addressing for the future
  • describe route summarization with IPv4 and IPv6
  • implement route summarization with IPv4 and IPv6
  • describe public and private addressing
  • describe how to avoid readdressing
  • describe video traffic

Overview/Description
Designing today’s networks requires you to consider more than just data communication. You also need to design your network to support voice and video communications. As such, you need to understand the business needs of voice, video, and data traffic in your network. In addition, to scale your IP network and take advantage of features and services that will improve the overall network you need to have a proper addressing plan in place. The last thing you want to do is re-address the network because you did not design the addressing plan correctly. This course describes what needs to be considered when designing a network that supports voice and video communications. It also introduces you to IP addressing and how to design a proper addressing plan to meet current and future needs.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing a Secure Network and Edge Connectivity

Course Number:
cc_desn_a05_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing a Secure Network and Edge Connectivity

  • start the course
  • outline and describe security goals
  • describe securing the perimeter
  • describe firewalls
  • describe the flavors of firewalls
  • describe recommended practices associated with firewalls
  • describe IPS/IDS fundamentals
  • describe recommended practices associated with IPS/IDS
  • describe network access control
  • describe security implications of client access methods
  • describe Edge Connectivity Design
  • describe DMZ
  • describe DMZ segmentation
  • describe DMZ service placing
  • describe Internet connectivity
  • describe Internet edge with high availability
  • describe VPN design
  • describe site-to-site VPN use cases
  • describe remote access flavors
  • describe security services design
  • describe edge device selection
  • describe NAT placement
  • describe the advantages and disadvantages of IDS and IPS

Overview/Description
Being successful requires Internet connectivity. Without it, you are not connected to the vast resources that are available to you and your success. However, being connected raises security issues both internally and externally. These issues need to be addressed during network design, not after. This course will provide you with security and edge connectivity recommendations. This course focuses on security design best practices for firewalls as well as IPSs and IDSs. In addition, it covers edge connectivity which includes a discussion on DMZs, Internet connectivity, VPNs, and NAT.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing Plans

Course Number:
cc_desn_a12_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing Plans

  • start the course
  • describe planning the IP addressing hierarchy
  • implement planning the IP addressing hierarchy
  • describe creating an addressing plan
  • implement creating an addressing plan
  • describe an IPv4 address space
  • implement an IPv4 address space
  • describe resolving overlapping address ranges
  • describe allocating more IP addresses
  • describe voice overlay subnets
  • describe the need for loopbacks
  • describe the benefits and challenges of IPv6 addressing
  • describe the structure of an IPv6 address
  • describe the components of the structure of an IPv6 address
  • describe IPv6 for an enterprise
  • describe IPv6 address allocation, linked IPv4 into IPv6
  • describe IPv6 address allocation per location/type
  • describe location-based subnetting
  • describe type-based subnetting
  • describe IPv6 address allocation per VLAN
  • describe IPv4 and IPv6 coexistence
  • describe IPv4 Address Space

Overview/Description
Proper IPv4 and IPv6 addressing has many benefits. Without proper addressing, the network will still work but you will be unable to scale the network easily or take advantage of the many features that improve network performance. Therefore, you should always take your time to plan and create the best addressing plan. This course discusses how to plan and create an appropriate IPv4 and IPv6 addressing plan that will meet current needs and scale to future needs.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing Routed Networks with EIGRP and OSPF

Course Number:
cc_desn_a08_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing Routed Networks with EIGRP and OSPF

  • start the course
  • describe interior and exterior routing protocols
  • describe route summarization
  • describe originating default routes
  • describe route redistribution
  • describe the importance of avoiding transit traffic
  • describe defensive filtering
  • describe cases for passive interfaces
  • describe routing protocol fast convergence
  • describe coexistence of IPv4 and IPv6 IGP routing
  • describe routing protocol authentication
  • describe a single-homed site
  • implement a single-homed site
  • describe a dual-homed site
  • describe geographic dispersion of HQ
  • implement summarizing towards the core
  • describe OSPF areas
  • describe OSPF LSAs
  • describe OSPF summarization
  • describe OSPF path selection
  • describe OSPF stubby areas
  • implement OSPF path selection

Overview/Description
Default EIGRP and OSPF settings are great for small and many medium-sized networks. However, to build large-scale networks you need to take advantage of the various features and services provided by the routing protocols. Without these features, they may not behave as you intend them. This course covers the features provided by EIGRP and OSPF that allow them to run more efficiently in large networks. Features such as route summarization, default routes, filtering, passive interface, EIGRP Stub routers, and OSPF Stubby areas, are covered.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing Routed Networks with IS-IS and BGP

Course Number:
cc_desn_a09_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing Routed Networks with IS-IS and BGP

  • start the course
  • describe IS-IS
  • describe IS-IS Areas
  • describe inter-router communication
  • describe CLNS addressing
  • describe IS-IS metric
  • describe IS-IS authentication
  • describe basic IS-IS configuration
  • describe IS-IS for IPv6
  • describe expanding IS-IS design
  • compare single and dual-homing
  • describe multihoming
  • describe the implications of running full BGP routing table
  • describe running a partial Internet table
  • describe the BGP route selection process
  • describe influencing outbound and inbound routing
  • describe how weight attribute influences outbound routing
  • describe how local preference influences outbound routing
  • describe how setting MED outbound influences outbound routing
  • describe setting communities outbound
  • describe prepending AS path
  • describe avoiding loops when forwarding to the Internet
  • describe route dampening
  • describe coexistence of BGP for IPv4 and IPv6
  • implement multihoming

Overview/Description
IS-IS and BGP are used mainly in Service Provider environments because of their ability to support very large networks. However, there are benefits to using these protocols in an Enterprise network. If you are looking to influence inbound or outbound traffic for your routing domain with multiple Service Providers, BGP would benefit you. This course introduces you to IS-IS and its basic configuration. It also describes how you can expand an IS-IS design to support large networks. The course also covers when BGP should be used between an Enterprise network and a Service Provider. It focuses on multihomed connectivity and how to take advantage of inbound and outbound routing policies.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Designing Wide Area Networks

Course Number:
cc_desn_a06_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Designing Wide Area Networks

  • start the course
  • describe WAN topologies
  • describe how to connect remote sites
  • describe WAN considerations
  • compare provider-managed VPNs layer 2 and layer 3
  • describe MPLS
  • describe layer 3 VPN: MPLS/VPN
  • describe VPWS and VPLS
  • give an overview of enterprise-managed VPNs
  • describe IPsec
  • describe enterprise-managed VPN: IPsec tunnel mode
  • describe enterprise-managed VPNs: GRE over IPsec
  • describe enterprise-managed VPNs
  • implement enterprise-managed VPNs
  • describe DMVPN in enterprise-managed VPNs
  • implement DMVPN in enterprise-managed VPNs
  • describe enterprise-managed VPNs: IPsec VTI
  • describe enterprise-managed VPNs: GETVPN
  • describe making choices in enterprise-managed VPNs
  • describe the enterprise-managed VPN options

Overview/Description
Determining how to connect remote offices to a main site is a skill you must have. Based on the applications that are using the WAN, you will want to select the most appropriate option available. This course describes which options to consider based on a given set of needs. This course focuses on various WAN technologies, including MPLS VPNs, VPWS, IPsec VPNs, GRE over IPsec, DMVPNs, IPsec VTIs, and GETVPN. It will help you identify the best solution based on your needs.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Managing IP Addresses and Introducing SDN

Course Number:
cc_desn_a13_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Managing IP Addresses and Introducing SDN

  • start the course
  • describe IP address management
  • describe IPv4 address assignment recommended practices
  • describe IPv6 address assignment recommended practices
  • describe DNS recommended practices
  • compare DHCP and DNS servers in a network
  • define SDN
  • describe the need for SDN
  • describe the path to network programmability
  • implement the path to network programmability
  • describe SDN flavors
  • describe SDN framework
  • describe SDN controllers
  • compare southbound and northbound APIs
  • describe OpenFlow
  • describe OpenDaylight
  • describe Cisco ACI
  • describe DHCP and DNS servers

Overview/Description
Managing IP addressing is a challenge due to the number of addresses that you will be dealing with. By following practices that have been tested in the industry for years, you will be able to design a sound management solution for any network. Software Defined Networking (SDN) is making the future of networking very exciting. Designing current networks with the ability to support SDN down the road will pay dividends in the long term. This course focuses on best practices for IPv4 and IPv6 addresses management and assignment. It also covers best practices related to DNS and DHCP deployment. Software Defined Networking is also introduced in this course.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Network Design Methodologies

Course Number:
cc_desn_a01_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Network Design Methodologies

  • start the course
  • describe a business-driven network
  • describe how to plan, build, and manage a business-driven network
  • describe the plan phase
  • describe the build phase
  • describe the manage phase
  • outline and describe project deliverables
  • describe why proper characterization is necessary
  • describe the steps you need to take in gathering information about an existing network
  • describe auditing the existing network
  • use tools to characterize existing networks
  • implement SNMP to gather information
  • use NetFlow to gather information
  • use CDP or LLDP to gather information
  • document the existing network
  • compare the top-down and bottom-up approaches to design
  • describe pilots and prototypes
  • implement the top-down approach to design

Overview/Description
Designing a network is easy when you have a structured plan to follow and the right tools. This course provides you with a plan and introduces you to common tools that can be used. This course covers the Plan, Build, and Manage phases of all networks. It also describes how to gather information during the planning phase using common networking tools. Lastly, it focuses on the most efficient way to design a network, from the Top-down. This course is one of a series in the Skillsoft learning path that covers the objectives for the Cisco exam Designing for Cisco Internetwork Solutions exam (200-310 DESGN). This exam counts toward the CCDA certification.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

Supporting QoS and Wireless in a Network Design

Course Number:
cc_desn_a10_it_enus
Lesson Objectives

Supporting QoS and Wireless in a Network Design

  • start the course
  • describe traffic characteristics
  • describe the need for QoS
  • describe QoS mechanisms
  • describe trust boundary
  • describe classification and marking in QoS mechanisms
  • describe classification tools
  • describe the QoS mechanisms – policing, shaping, and re-marking
  • describe the tools for managing congestion
  • describe the tools for congestion avoidance
  • describe the QoS deployment principles
  • describe recommended practice QoS design principles
  • describe design strategies
  • describe wireless LAN networks
  • describe autonomous WLAN architecture
  • describe centralized WLAN architecture
  • describe wireless bridge in specialty WLAN architecture
  • describe cloud-enabled WLAN architecture
  • describe LAN bandwidth considerations
  • describe trunk and VLAN configuration
  • compare WLAN and PoE
  • describe WLAN and end-to-end QoS
  • describe supporting wireless security
  • describe QoS mechanisms

Overview/Description
In a perfect world there would be no competition between traffic on a network and all traffic would be created equal. However, that is not the case. In order to support different applications and traffic types on the same network, you need to design QoS to ensure that sensitive traffic has priority. In addition, with the increasing number of mobile devices in networks you need to design a network that will be able to support wireless LANs. This course introduces you to QoS and covers design best practices for QoS mechanisms such as Classification, Marking, Policing, Shaping, and Re-marking. The course also covers Wireless LANs and the different design options that are available to meet business needs.

Target Audience
This path is intended for anyone who is interested in developing the skills needed to successfully design networks that will support voice, video, and data communications.

TestPrep 200-310 Designing for Cisco Internetwork Solutions (DESGN)

Course Number:
cc_desn_a01_tp_enus
Lesson Objectives

TestPrep 200-310 Designing for Cisco Internetwork Solutions (DESGN)

  • >

Overview/Description
To test your knowledge on the skills and competencies being measured by the vendor certification exam. TestPrep can be taken in either Study or Certification mode. Study mode is designed to maximize learning by not only testing your knowledge of the material, but also by providing additional information on the topics presented. Certification mode is designed to test your knowledge of the material within a structured testing environment, providing valuable feedback at the end of the test.

Target Audience
Individuals seeking practice in a structured testing environment, covering the skills and competencies being measured by the vendor certification exam.

Prerequisites: none

Close Chat Live